Pupil Premium Strategy 2021 - 2022

Student premium strategy statement

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This statement details our school’s use of student premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged students.

It outlines our student premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of student premium had within our school.

School overview

Detail

Data

School name

Tolworth Girls’ School & Sixth Form

Number of students in school

1,115

Proportion (%) of student premium eligible students

17.9%

Academic year/years that our current student premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021-24

Date this statement was published

18/10/21

Date on which it will be reviewed

17/10/22

Statement authorised by

 

Student premium lead

Laura Kelly

Governor / Trustee lead

 

 

Funding overview

Detail

Amount

Student premium funding allocation this academic year

£191,000

(£955 x 200 Ever 6 FSM)

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£29,739

Student premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£220,739

 

Part A: Student premium strategy plan - Statement of intent

As an inclusive Academy, our aim is to identify and implement strategies that help to reduce the attainment gap between the most and least disadvantaged students in our school community, to increase their cultural capital and to support their physical, social and mental wellbeing. (in line with School Development Plan)

The student premium strategy has been developed to improve the academic progress and life chances of our disadvantaged students. The strategy will focus on effective teaching, targeted academic support, accessible enrichment opportunities and other strategies and interventions that will enable our students to thrive and develop into successful and happy adults.

Common barriers to learning for disadvantaged students may include:

  • less support at home
  • weak language and communication skills
  • lack of confidence
  • more frequent behaviour difficulties
  • attendance and punctuality issues
  • Lack of access to culturally rich and diverse enrichment opportunities.

Our ultimate objectives are:

  • To eliminate the attainment gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students at Tolworth Girls School.
  • For all disadvantaged students in school to meet or exceed nationally expected progress Rates
  • For all Disadvantaged students to access education regularly
  • For all disadvantaged students to access to the rich extra-curricular provision on offer and be well-rounded individuals who achieve their ambitions and flourish in life

We aim to do this through:

  • frequent monitoring of qualitative and quantitative data to ensure accurate and timely

identification of students in need of support

  • ensuring that teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all the students and

that where students have specific needs that these are addressed through high quality,

evidence based interventions led by appropriately trained staff

  • ensuring all vulnerable learners are ready to learn through access to a breakfast club,

equipment and uniform provision and a homework club

  • close monitoring of attendance at extracurricular provisions along with promotion and

support to increase the attendance of vulnerable learners

  • Ensuring that vulnerable learners have access to frequent and high quality careers and associated opportunities such as attendance at careers events and access to Apprenticeship & University experiences.
  • ensuring that vulnerable learners have access to high quality pastoral and mental health support

When making provision for socially disadvantaged students, we recognise that not all students who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged and that not all students who are socially disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals. We reserve the right to allocate Pupil Premium funding to support any student or groups of students the school has legitimately identified as being socially disadvantaged.

 

Pupil Premium funding will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify

  • priority classes
  • Groups or individuals.

Limited funding and resources means that not all children receiving free school meals will be in receipt of Student Premium interventions at one time.

Achieving these objectives:

The range of provisions available at Tolworth Girls’ School include but are not limited to:

  • Frequent monitoring and intervention of progress and needs from the SLT, Heads of Faculty, Subject Leaders and Heads of Year.
  • An identified leader in each Year group with responsibility for Pupil Premium students.
  • literacy and numeracy support which includes in class support and small group withdrawal
  • academic mentoring for students in Y10/11 with SLT members
  • running a breakfast club to ensure vulnerable learners are prepared for the day
  • tracking and monitoring attendance to provide intervention and support where a need is identified
  • frequent contact and support with parents regarding uniform, equipment, extracurricular activities, trips and revision resources
  • providing laptops to support with access to homework and remote learning
  • providing priority access to counselling and careers support advisors
  • Outstanding teaching and learning will ensure that all students receive an excellent and aspirational day-to-day educational experience
  • Intense intervention in Year 7 to support students in accessing the curriculum and to reduce any gaps due to differences in learning experience or due to lost learning in primary school as a result of the Coved -19 pandemic.
  • support catch up learning in all years
  • To provide targeted, subject specific support and interventions to students in their GCSE years, this includes exam and revision booster sessions.
  • supporting the emotional wellbeing of our disadvantaged students in light of the needs within our given context

The Academy draws on the latest research from the EEF and the Sutton Trust, and works with relevant bodies outside of the Academy, to ensure that we are drawing on advice and best practice in supporting those students eligible for student premium.

 

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged students.

Challenge number

Detail of challenge

1

Progress in Maths

2

Progress in English

3

To achieve and sustain improved wellbeing for all pupils including those that are disadvantaged

4

Attendance of pupil premium students is below that of our Non-PP and some of our students are not equipped to learn.

5

Homework and independent learning concerns

6

Involvement and engagement in enrichment opportunities is lower among PP

 

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Progress in Maths

Pupil Premium learners achieving at least in line with, or above national progress

measures in maths at KS4.

 

Progress in KS3 maths for PP learners is at or above their expected attainment pathway.

· Gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged pupils is lower than NA

· Disadvantaged achieve at least in line with national.

· Rigorous testing process in place to identify any needs for intervention.

· Evident increase in knowledge of key skills in numeracy shown through low stakes in-class assessments, formal regular assessments and public examinations.

· Overhaul of the SOL to embed Maths Mastery practices will increase attainment for all students including PP and SEND learners.

· Student voice shows increased confidence and enjoyment in mathematics.

Progress in English

Pupil Premium learners achieving at least in

line with, or above national progress

measures in English at KS4.

 

Progress in KS3 English for PP learners is at

Or above their expected attainment pathway.

 

Disadvantaged students are confident speakers and take up extracurricular opportunities

· Rigorous testing process in place to identify any needs for intervention.

 

· Disadvantaged achieve at least in line with national.

 

· Evident increase in knowledge of key skills in literacy shown through class assessments, formal regular assessments and public examinations.

 

· Pupil voice shows increased confidence and enjoyment in English.

 

· Students take part in the Jack Petchey Speak Out days

 

· Students complete their Speaking and Listening Component and are as confident and articulate as their peers

Attendance of Pupil Premium students  below that of our Non-PP.

Some key students are not ready to learn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

. The attendance of PP learners to meet the school target of 96%.

· To work with all external agencies who support our reluctant attenders so that their attendance increases over time.

· HOY meet regularly with the Attendance Officer and have a clear plan in place for pupils with low attendance.

· Staff are aware of difficulties that may impact PP learners and have plans in place to support these.

· AHOY run specific programmes to support PP attendance and punctuality

· Affordable uniform with financial support available to PP learners.

· PP learners to have access to laptops if needed so that they can access software and online information to support their own learning.

· Equipment, such as stationery, GCSE subject specific equipment provided to PP learners where needed.

· PP parents are aware that they have access to financial support to assist with purchasing equipment and resources.

· Tutor equipment checks to show that PP learners are equipped for the school day in line with Non-PP learners.

· Teaching staff are quick to liaise with AHOY to ensure that any lack of equipment is quickly resolved.

· PP learners access breakfast club, are  punctual and have energy for their day

· The attendance of PP parents/carers at Parents’ Evenings is at or above that of Non-PP learners.

· Parent /carers surveys show engagement and satisfaction with school and school life.

             

 

 

Wellbeing

To achieve and sustain improved wellbeing for all pupils including those that are disadvantaged.

· Continue the work that we are doing with the MH Cluster so that we access all of the support and latest research on MH/WB

· Encourage all students to access Kooth to support their MH/WB

· Parent /carers surveys show engagement and satisfaction with school and school life

· Targeted projects from pastoral team to focus on WB/MH and improved engagement with school

· Improved access to extra- curricular and enrichment opportunities in school

· Internal qualitative data shows that students feel positive about their school experience

· Students know who to go to and who to seek advice and guidance from about MH/EWB

Homework and independent learning

To help students complete HW with resources and support-

To provide students with opportunities to develop their independent learning skills and approaches to learning

To provide laptops for PP students in need

· Provide spaces for students to complete homework with appropriate resources.

· Targeted 1:1 support for specific students.

· Weekend access to school.

· AHOY targeted support and intervention on study skills

· SSW’s conduct learning support interviews which PP students are prioritised for

 

Extracurricular

Pupil Premium learners are fully engaged

and participating in the school’s rich extracurricular offer.

· Prioritised places are available on trips for PP learners to ensure fair access.

· Monitoring of extracurricular activity attendance to show that at all students have been asked to attend.

· Analyse and monitor PP involvement in activities outside of school including trips to ensure that they are experiencing enrichment activities.

· Extracurricular providers are aware of the need to promote PP attendance and promote/invite/prioritise PP learners.

. Improved access to extra- curricular and enrichment opportunities in school

. Internal qualitative data shows that students feel positive about their school experience

. Students know who to go to and who to seek advice and guidance from about MH/EWB

Homework and independent learning

To help students complete HW with resources and support-

To provide students with opportunities to develop their independent learning skills and approaches to learning

To provide laptops for PP students in need

. Provide spaces for students to complete homework with appropriate resources.

. Targeted 1:1 support for specific students.

. Weekend access to school.

. AHOY targeted support and intervention on study skills

. SSW’s conduct learning support interviews which PP students are prioritised for

Extracurricular

Pupil Premium learners are fully engaged

and participating in the school’s rich extracurricular offer.

. Prioritised places are available on trips for PP learners to ensure fair access.

. Monitoring of extracurricular activity attendance to show that at all students have been asked to attend.

. Analyse and monitor PP involvement in activities outside of school including trips to ensure that they are experiencing enrichment activities.

. Extracurricular providers are aware of the need to promote PP attendance and promote/invite/prioritise PP learners.

 

Activity in this academic year

Teaching and Learning Budgeted cost: £163,497.0

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Heads of Faculty

closely monitor and

intervene where the

progress of disadvantaged learners is below that of non-disadvantaged learners or below that of their expected attainment pathway.

 

“Good teaching is the most important

Lever schools have to improve outcomes for disadvantaged pupils.”

Heads of faculties promote positive

engagement and teaching strategies

With Pupil Premium students.

Heads of faculties track PP students

progress and the HOY and AHT will work to help signpost needs for targeted

Intervention.

 Evidence consistently shows the positive impact that targeted academic support can have.

1/2

Literacy Lead promotes

literacy, provides staff

CPD and monitors and

supports reading

Interventions.

 

ERIC Reading Reimagined introduced to help students with their reading and Comprehension skills and to support widening their vocabulary – a key factor to support progress

Reading is a key determiner for academic success- closing the reading gap leads to improved confidence and improved outcomes.

Paired reading with older students also helps to close the reading gap and build confidence in emerging readers

 

 

2

Smaller classes in all core subjects so that learning can be deeper and individualised and allows teachers to teach differently, maximising interactions with students and minimising low level disruption.

Education endowment foundation- targeted academic support

 

 

 

1/2

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £ 85,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

AHOY projects- that focus specifically on the PP students

Building resilience

Positive learning etc.

This model from last year shows that this level of support makes an impact of PP attendance

 

Mentoring (EEF +2 months)

 

Behaviour interventions (EEF +4 months)

 

Effect sizes reported by John Hattie report (2016) show that behavioural intervention programmes have an effect size of 0.62 and specific interventions linked to needs has an effect size of 0.77.

 

3/4/5/6

Provide revision guides and resources to support Homework

EEF report on HW

5

Night school

Motivation group

Targeted subject intervention.

 

The EEF Toolkit shows that extending the school day has a positive impact on students as long as it is well planned and targeted.

EEF also states

Small group tuition has an average impact of four months’ additional progress over the course of a year.

 

Small group tuition is most likely to be effective if it is targeted at pupils’ specific needs. Diagnostic assessment can be used to assess the best way to target support.

1/2/3/4/5/6

Attendance work- buy in more EWO support

Designated Attendance officer

Sutton Trust

4

Small group tutoring for year 11 disadvantaged learners who are at risk of not securing a pass or below expected pathway

Groups aimed at 3/4 borderline and 6/7 borderline

EFF Toolkit states

On average, one to one tuition is very effective at improving pupil outcomes. One to one tuition might be an effective strategy for providing targeted support for pupils that are identified as having low prior attainment or are struggling in particular areas

 

1/2

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £ 57,000

Activity

Evidence that supports this approach

Challenge number(s) addressed

Increased spending on EWO ‘Buy in’ service.

The EWO supports both the child and the parent to access school.

This model has proved effective over time with the greatest impact on the 90% attendees

DFE (2016) found that the higher the overall absence rate across KS4 the lower the likely level of attainment at the end of KS4. “Overall absence had a statistically negative link to attainment.”

3/4

Designated Pastoral leader (AHOY) to lead on PP projects to increase engagement in school and improve attendance

This model from last year shows that this level of support makes an impact on PP attendance

3/5/6

Designated Enrichment/extracurricular leader to promote these activities and to work with pastoral team on analysing PP engagement.

EEF engagement in longer days Arts /sports etc.

6

Employ Student Support workers  to provide 1:1 support and group work to deal with MH/WB

EEF- mentoring report

3/4

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 305.497.0

 

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Student premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our student premium activity had on students in the 2020 to 2021 academic year.

 The main focus for 2020-21 was to ensure that our PPG students:

  • Receive outstanding Teaching & Learning
  • Attended school and or engaged with online learning
  • Achieved Outcomes that were in line with their peers
  • Were supported with their MH/WB
  • Accessed support with their learning

Teaching and Learning strategies focussed on questioning, retrieval practice and meaningful feedback. This was quickly adapted to ensure that teachers were still able to implement these practices both when teaching in person and virtually; training was conducted with staff so that they were empowered to do this. QA visits were limited during the year and but Work and lesson sampling did take place virtually.

The QAR also took place and was incredibly positive.

There is still a gap between the achievement of PPM and non-PPM students which needs to be narrowed. More departments need to have QA visits to ensure high quality teaching for all; this needs to be followed up with student voice.

The attendance in school and online was incredibly positive for our PP students- contact was made with all families to ensure that they had access to IT and also the Internet- in all 150 laptops were given to students who did not have them at home. We also shared the free ‘top-up’ MOB ‘vouchers with them so that access to the Internet could be maintained. Attendance for PPG students was 92% compared to non PP of 95% during lockdown, phone calls home were made to PPG students as part of our well-being checks for the vulnerable students and we aimed to get these students into school to work with the teacher’s onsite if there were issues with attendance.

Outcomes

The Outcomes for our PPG students was very positive and was about national averages for similar groups and their peers.

 

Target FFT

2019 outcomes

2020 outcomes

2021 TAG whole cohort

PP

Data

P8

 

0.59

0.89

0.89

0.79

A8

54

52.28

53.95

54.61

42.21

Eng/Maths 5+

56%

46%

54%

60%

35%

Eng/Maths 4+

79%

72%

79%

82%

70%

5+ @9-5

 

57%

60%

62%

68%

 Targeted support:

AHOY projects took place to focus on our PPG students, their attitude to learning and their involvement in school.

Admin support contacted parents of PPM students when they hadn’t made parents evenings appointments to encourage them to do so; the attendance was still lower for the PPG cohort (Year 10: 45% PPM parents; 73% whole cohort)

The National Tutoring Programme was used for English and Maths with a cohort of Year 11 students; however due to being conducted virtually this was not as successful for all students as we would have hoped.

Other approaches:

Support to overcome barriers were implemented (e.g. laptops provided, work printed off and delivered during lockdown). An increased number of students came into school and were supported on site with their learning; disadvantaged students were contacted and encouraged to attend. A small number of students attended for pastoral support.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme

Provider

Anstee Bridge

RBK

Malden Oaks- the PRU

RBK

MH project

SW London CCG

Counselling

Hope Trust

 

Further information (optional)

Use this space to provide any further information about your student premium strategy. For example, about your strategy planning, or other activity that you are implementing to support disadvantaged students, that is not dependent on student premium or recovery premium funding.

 

**Please click here to open a PDF. version 'Pupil Premium Strategy 2021 - 2022'

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